THE COLONIAL LEGISLATION, CURRENT STATE OF RURAL AREAS IN ZIMBABWE AND REMEDIAL MEASURES TAKEN TO PROMOTE RURAL DEVELOPMENT.

Tinashe Mitchell Mashizha, Jephias Mapuva

Abstract


This paper reviews remedial measures taken to achieve the objectives of rural development in the post-independence Zimbabwe. The research looks at colonial legislative and how it hindered development in rural communities. Colonial state undertook some legislative measures concerning land management that disadvantaged Africans. The black community becomes disempowered, disenfranchised and landless. Land polices alienated indigenous people and created livelihood insecurity. This desktop research collected data from published and unpublished literature. The paper identifies a number of policies implemented after 1980 and examines their impacts in enhancing food security, employment and growth in rural areas of Zimbabwe. The aim of these policies is to correct imbalances created by white settlers and inject economic empowerment in rural communities. In particular, the review claims that rural communities are impacted. Whilst these policies are attempts to bring the long awaited rural development, they have heavily flawed. Despite this, rural development needs support from indigenous black Zimbabweans. The conclusion reflects that if policies are implemented properly, the goals of rural development can be achieved.

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